Intermountain Indian School Walking Tour

Buildings 40 and 326 - Boys and Girls Gyms

Upon arrival at Intermountain, students were dropped off at the gyms where they met faculty, administrators, and staff, and were then given the information that they needed for school at Intermountain — such as their dorm rooms, classes, and health…

Buildings 327 and 328 (Classrooms)

These two buildings were not built when Bushnell was open, but were designed to hold academic classes such as English, math, and art. Students also eventually had classes such as printmaking, journalism, and graphic design in these buildings. Peggy…

Building 329 (Theater)

While Alan Houser was at Intermountain, he painted several murals in the theatre. These images showcased several motifs of western art as well as landscapes that were familiar to many of the Navajo students, including the Mittens, which stand in…

Building 57 (Church)

Students at the Intermountain Indian School were required to attend church - although it could be any church they wanted. (No, the Native American Church was not an option.) The Catholic church, St. Henry's, was a nearby option. The church has…

Buildings 81 and 321 (Art Building, solo parent apartments)

These buildings were originally officer quarters while Bushnell was open, which meant the buildings were relatively nicer and sturdier than some of the dormitory buildings. As a result, these buildings have remained in relatively decent shape,…

Buildings 1-3 (Administration Building and Honor Dorms )

The Administration Building at Bushnell stood in the direct center of the property, with the Nurses’ Quarters to the east. Though the area of several of the buildings that were used as the nurses’ quarters was later turned into a golf course,…

Building 10 (Girls’ Dorms)

These buildings were part of several patient wards at Bushnell.This building was a part of the girls’ dorm cluster. Each cluster was made up of two buildings called a “block.” These two buildings were connected by hallways, but doors and hallways…

Buildings 32-35 (Study Hall and Detention)

One of the buildings also acted as a detention center for students who were found off campus, and students who were caught drinking. Though there were two different buildings for the punishment -- one was a sort of “Study Hall” designed to make…

Building 35 (Daycare)

This building was part of several wards at Bushnell and potentially acted as an area where doctors met with patients who arrived via train.This building was used as the daycare for the children of the Solo Parent Program. The Room Loft opened about a…

Building 52 (Maintenance)

The clerestory architecture of this building is reminiscent of buildings often used for maintenance and laundry. Though the Bushnell Map has the general area marked “Wards,” there is a picture of a patient arrival that suggests it could have been an…

Buildings 37-38 (Cafeteria)

This area is marked “Mess Hall” and “Nutrition Street” on the Bushnell map and suggests that this area was reserved for the cafeteria of Bushnell. It stood alone, dead center in the property, acting as the nucleus of Bushnell.Each cluster of dorms…

Buildings 43-42 (Student-Athlete Dorms)

Because these dorms were closest to the gyms, they often housed some of the student-athletes. Typically, students in these dorms would wake up and run up to the “I” and back, in training for track and field. Intermountain took pride in their sports…
This project was funded in part by Utah Humanities.